King-Gamache Family History Page


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   Notes   Linked to 
201 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2699)
 
202 According to US Census of 1900, Leon was 69 in 1900 putting his birth year at 1831.

Census of Marquette County, Humboldt Twp
vol. 49, ED 107, Sheet 1, Line 25 
Campeau, Leon (I1038)
 
203 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2756)
 
204 according to WWI draft registration 5 Jun 1917; living in Creighton, KNOX, Nebraska Kratky, Stephen Frank (I5903)
 
205 according to WWII draft card TEIOSANIA, ROMANIA Sigal, Louis (I546)
 
206 according to WWII draft card TEIOSANIA, ROMANIA Sigal, Louis (I546)
 
207 Accountant Jacobson, Harry L. (I237)
 
208 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I176)
 
209 Achille Gamache, b. 12 Sep, baptized 13 Sep 1865 L'Islet-sur-Mer (Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours), L'Islet County, Quebec, son of Clovis & Flore Thibaut -godparents- Jacques Florent Gamache & Adelaide Thibaut Gamache, Achille (I6294)
 
210 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I922)
 
211 Active US Army, 26 Oct 1942- 11 Nov 1945 Roy, Louis Joseph (I2671)
 
212 Adirondack Record-Post Friday Sept 26, 1919 Snye, Gladys Mary (I3338)
 
213 Adirondack Record-Post, Friday, August 11, 1922 Family F1144
 
214 Adirondack Record-Post, Thursday April 12, 1956 Snye, Henry Thomas (I3641)
 
215 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1823)
 
216 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1824)
 
217 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2136)
 
218 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2137)
 
219 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2152)
 
220 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2148)
 
221 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2149)
 
222 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2150)
 
223 adopted Colombo, Leona Ann (I2151)
 
224 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2448)
 
225 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2762)
 
226 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2876)
 
227 adopted Colcord, Edna M. (I4943)
 
228 adopted Langager, Andrew (I4946)
 
229 adopted Gamache, Raymond John (I73334830)
 
230 adopted Gamache, Rose (I73336747)
 
231 adopted Gamache, Joseph Anthony (I73336438)
 
232 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I15405)
 
233 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3065)
 
234 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1833)
 
235 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2230)
 
236 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F6082
 
237 Adopted as an infant Roy, Claire (I3569)
 
238 adopted by Mr.Lemanski Luellwitz-Lemanski, Dennis (I12322)
 
239 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I799)
 
240 adopted niece of Phyllis Chapman Gamache, Janice Audrey (I11562)
 
241 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I7459)
 
242 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I341)
 
243 After her mother died, Antoinette lived with her maternal grandmother King. Grandmother King, her daughter Henriette and Antoinette moved to Colorado inteh 19-teens to live with her uncle Peter King and his three children.

In 1920, Antoinette, aged 13, resides with her uncle Peter Kingandhis 3 daughters, and her grandmother Josephine and her aunt Henriette.

She entered the convent in 1924 and professed her vows in 1926.

In 1930, Sister Alice Loretto Duquette, aged 25,was a teacher at a school in Denver. 
Duquette, Marie Antoinette (I461)
 
244 After her mother died, Leontine was raised by her father's adoptive parents, Joseph Narcisse Duquette and Delima (Belanger) Duquette.

In 1910, 6 year old Leontine was living with her grandparents in Schoolcraft Twp. Michigan.

She became a nun some time between 1920 and 1930.

She died in Colorado in the later '40's or early '50's - at Cherry Hill 
Duquette, Leontine (I460)
 
245 After immigrating to the U.S. from Hungary in the 1920's and with not a dollar in his pocket, Herman Brody bought an existing furniture store in McDonald, PA in 1931 (negotiating a promissory note with the seller). In 1934 he and his brother Leo opened a Brody's store in Canonsburg which Leo managed until 1947. At that time, Herman's twin sons Herb and Sid entered the business. In 1951, Sid opened his own store in Steubenville, Ohio while Herb continued to manage the Canonsburg store. During that time, Brody's wasn't just a furniture store but more like a department store, carrying everything from furniture to toys to snow shovels!

Sid retired in 1997, closing the Steubenville store after 46 years. Herb subsequently turned the Canonsburg store over to his son Steve (3rd generation), who entered the business in 1991 and has been managing it ever since. Steve has kept the family tradition of providing his customers quality furniture at every day low prices with FREE DELIVERY, just like his grandfather did in 1931.

Shop Brody's and find out why people keep coming back! We have 3 large floors of quality furniture for every room in your home. Most of our sofas come with LIFETIME GUARANTEES, and our selection is one of the biggest in the area. Whether you just need one item or a whole house-full, we'll make your furniture experience a pleasure without the high pressure sales tactics that other stores use. Like my father and grandfather before me, I'm here to serve you!

Steve Brody,
Owner 
Brody, Stephen Louis (I674)
 
246 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5520)
 
247 Air Force P.O.W; WWII Gamache, Robert C. (I73332786)
 
248 Alabama, Deaths and Burials Index, 1881-1974

Name: Julia G Mackintosh
[Julia G Gamache]
Birth Date: abt 1862
Death Date: 11 Dec 1928
Death Place: Fairhope, Baldwin County, Alabama
Death Age: 66
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Father Name: Edw Gamache
Mother Name: Cornelia Martin
Spouse Name: Jas D Mackintosh
FHL Film Number: 1908460
Wills and Probates: Search for Julia G Mackintosh in Alabama Wills & Probates collection 
Gamache, Julia G. (I13442)
 
249 Albertina A Gamache was born on October 7, 1879 in Fall River, Massachusetts to Jean Baptiste Gamache and Marie Vigeant (both from Canada). She had two brothers and 4 sisters. She and Jean had 9 children; 5 girls and 4 boys. Their seventh child, Anna Maria only lived for 6 months. She died of spinal menangitis in November 1918.  Gamache, Alexandrine Albertine (I73333739)
 
250 Alexander Spotswood (c. 1676 ? 6 June 1740) was a Lieutenant-Colonel in the British Army and a noted Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. He is noted in Virginia and American history for a number of his projects as Governor, including his exploring beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains, his establishing what was perhaps the first colonial iron works, and his negotiating the Treaty of Albany with the Iroquois Nations of New York.

Alexander Spotswood was born in the Colony of Tangier, Morocco, about 1676 to Catharine (née Maxwell, c. 1638 - December 1709) and her second husband, Dr. Robert Spottiswoode (17 September 1637 - 1680), the Chirurgeon (Surgeon) to the Tangier Garrison.

Through his father, Alexander was a grandson of Judge Robert Spottiswoode (1596?1646), a great-grandson of Archbishop John Spottiswoode (1565?1639), and a descendant of King Robert II of Scotland through the 2nd Earls of Crawford.[1] Alexander's older half-brother (by his mother's first marriage to George Elliott) was Roger Elliott (c. 1655 - 15 May 1714), who became one of the first Governors of Gibraltar. Following the death of Robert Spotswood, his mother married thirdly, Reverend Dr. George Mercer, the Garrison's Schoolmaster.

On 20 May 1693, Alexander became an Ensign in the Earl of Bath's Regiment of Foot. He was commissioned in 1698, and promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in 1703. He was appointed Quartermaster-General of the Duke of Marlborough's army the same year, and was wounded at the Battle of Blenheim the following year.

Lieutenant Governor of Virginia[edit]
In 1710, Alexander was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, under the nominal governorship of George Hamilton, 1st Earl of Orkney. He was the first to occupy the new Governors Mansion, which many citizens thought overly extravagant (its 20th-century reconstruction is now one of the principal landmarks in Colonial Williamsburg). in 1711, he intervened in Cary's Rebellion in North Carolina, sending a contingent of Royal Marines from the Chesapeake to put down the rebellion. A Tobacco Act requiring the inspection of all tobacco intended for export or for use as legal tender was passed in 1713. The next year, he founded the First Germanna Colony, and regulated trade with native Americans at another of his pet projects, Fort Christanna. In 1715, he bought 3229 acres (13 km²) at Germanna.

In 1716 he led the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe Expedition up the Rappahannock River valley and across the Blue Ridge Mountains at Swift Run Gap into the Shenandoah Valley to expedite settlement. The following year saw the foundation of the Second Germanna Colony and the Repeal of regulation of trade with native Americans. A Third Germanna Colony followed in 1719, and Germanna was made the seat of Spotsylvania County the following year.

Between 1716 and 1720, Spotswood built the Tubal Works. It had a cold blast-charcoal blast furnace which produced pig iron, and probably a finery forge. (It is the site of the 19th-century Scotts Ironworks). It operated for about 40 years. Pig iron from Tubal is in the collections of the Fredericksburg Area Museum and the NPS (Spotsylvania Courthouse). Tubal Works iron was exported to England by 1723.[2] In May of the same year, Gov. Drysdale reported to the Lords of Trade that Spotswood was selling "backs and frames for Chumnies, Potts, doggs, frying, stewing, and backing panns" at auction in Williamsburg.

Around 1732 at Massaponax, Spotswood built what may have been the first purpose-built foundry in the British North American Colonies. This was a double-air furnace (usually used to make cannon) and was used to recast pig iron produced at Tubal into final shapes (kettles, andirons, firebacks, etc. and possibly cannon). Neither of Spotswood's iron operations were at Germanna. Spotswood was not, as is commonly believed, involved in the Fredericksville Furnace.[3]

In the fall of 1718, Spotswood engaged in a clandestine expedition by privately hiring two sloops, Jane and Ranger, and a number of Royal Navy men to seek out the pirate Blackbeard (Edward Teach). On 18 November 1718, Lt. Robert Maynard sailed from Hampton, Virginia to Ocracoke Inlet, North Carolina. On 22 November 1718, Maynard and his men defeated Blackbeard and the pirates. On 24 November 1718, two days after Blackbeard's death, Spotswood issued a proclamation at the Assembly in Williamsburg offering reward for any who brought Teach and the other pirates to justice.

Spotswood worked to make a Treaty with the Iroquois through their meeting in Albany, New York during 1721. It was an attempt to end the raids between the Iroquois and Catawba that endangered settlers in the Shenandoah Valley. The Iroquois agreed to stay north of the Potomac and west of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The agreement was renewed the next year.

Spotswood completed the Governor's palace in 1722, when he was recalled from the lieutenant governorship and replaced by Hugh Drysdale. Throughout his career, Spotswood had maintained an adversarial relationship with the Virginia Council, especially its most prominent member, James Blair. As the Bishop of London's representative in the colony, the President of the College of William and Mary, and a councilman in Virginia's highest legislative body, Blair was arguably the most powerful man in the colony. He successfully orchestrated the recall of three royally appointed governors, including Alexander Spotswood.

Later life[edit]
The latter entered private life with 80,000 acres (324 km²) in Spotsylvania and three iron furnaces.

Returning to London, Spotswood married Butler Brayne in March 1724/1725, but was back at the 'Enchanted Castle', Germanna, by 1729. He served as Deputy Postmaster General from 1730 to 1739, and died on 7 June 1740 at Annapolis, Maryland. 
Spotswood, Major General, Sir Alexander (I13892)
 

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